Archive for Science fiction dystopias

SLUGGISH MORSS/SLUGGISH MORSS: A DELICATE TIME IN HISTORY, Review

Posted in Game Tirades, Uncategorized with tags , , , on February 6, 2016 by helenparker1212

 

A philosophical trek through time and space; this duo will mess with your head

Sluggish Morrs

It’s easy to understand, while you’re being chastised by a pair of psychedelically coloured elephant-like beings over your inability to collect enough coins, why this new game from indie developer Jake Clover has been described as the most WTF game ever.

Aboard the spaceship Sluggish Morss, bound for a planet called Sedno Keir, your character (a pink mole-like being who is constantly smoking and languidly lounging) is disturbed from their reggae reverie by a pair of Technicolored elephants, who order you to collect coins which will lead you on a journey to find out just WTF is going on.

Check the rest of the review out at theartsdesk.com

Ridley Scott’s ‘Blade Runner’ as cult film – an essay

Posted in Essays, Film Tirades with tags , , , , , on February 27, 2009 by helenparker1212

“I’ve seen things you people wouldn’t believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched C beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhauser Gate. All those moment will be lost, in time. Like tears, in the rain…Time to die.” (Roy Battey, Blade Runner)

“like science fiction pornography – all sensation and no heart.” (Pat Berman State and Columbia Record, Columbia, South Carolina, July 2, 1982)

roy

In this essay I have chosen to discuss Ridley Scott’s 1982 film Blade Runner as a primary example of a ‘cult’ film. I will begin by exploring the various definitions and debates surrounding the term ‘cult cinema’, and the different categories of cult film, with particular focus on the debate over the relevance of the ‘midnight movie’ phenomena in the age of the internet, TV, and video/DVD rental. I will then analyse Ridley Scott’s 1982 science fiction film Blade Runner as an example of the cult category ‘the resurrected financial/critical flop’. I will then explore the reasons why this film attained cult status, looking at its appeal to niche audiences, and also its appeal to those attempting to unravel the mysteries and mistakes surrounding its production history. I will explore the relevance of generic hybridity in a film’s progression from cult to mainstream success, and ask whether or not a cult film can still retain its cult badge of honour once it has achieved this success.

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